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The best insulation you can use to improve energy efficiency without compromising design

With industry-leading thermal performance, spray foam is becoming the preferred alternative to more traditional materials such as fibreglass. It gives architects more creative freedom too

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HBS spray foam insulation reduces energy consumption and contains only environmentally friendly and long-lasting materials, which has a positive impact on the environment.
HBS spray foam insulation reduces energy consumption and contains only environmentally friendly and long-lasting materials, which has a positive impact on the environment.

If architects are to achieve ever greater levels of building efficiency, they will need innovative materials.

Spray foam insulation from Huntsman Building Solutions (HBS) gives architects the ability to deliver heightened levels of thermal efficiency without compromising design or function.

It outperforms traditional insulation materials, such as fibreglass and mineral wool, and is one of the most energy efficient and innovative products available.

HBS spray foam maintains its properties for the entire lifespan of a property and minimises air leakage. This improves heat retention, reducing the energy costs of heating systems that no longer need to work so hard.

Spray foam is a functional and practical solution. Lightweight and durable, it can be applied quickly and easily by professionals and adheres to many substrates to seal gaps and improve airtightness.

  • Choosing the right product for a specific application is a critical design decision. The HBS architectural support team provides expert advice on a variety of applications.
    Choosing the right product for a specific application is a critical design decision. The HBS architectural support team provides expert advice on a variety of applications.
  • Architects can add LEED points to their projects with energy efficient spray foam such as HBS’s.
    Architects can add LEED points to their projects with energy efficient spray foam such as HBS’s.
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Applied in liquid form, the spray foam expands on impact to create a vapour-permeable layer that strengthens the thermal performance of the building envelope.

While spray foam insulation is now becoming more popular in the UK, it has been used for more than three decades in Canada and the US to deliver high-performance residential and commercial buildings.

With its Icynene, Demilec and Lapolla SPF spray foam brands, HBS is helping architects, specifiers and building owners benefit from superior insulation.

The company is currently working with industry bodies to develop a code of practice for the industry. It delivers hands-on training for professionals and shares expertise on how spray foam insulation can enhance building performance.

For more information and technical support, visit huntsmanbuildingsolutions.com

 

Contact:

01485 500668

architect@huntsmanbuilds.com


 

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