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I’m Loving It

Save for a serious night on the tiles with the commercial team, there’s not much cause for PIP to bring up hamburger giant McDonalds in these pages; but if the subject turns from boozy tiles to some very worthy bricks, then we’re all ears. Keppie Design’s Ronald McDonald House in Glasgow provides shelter for the families of kids that are undergoing treatment at the adjacent Royal Hospital for Sick Children. The building is a series of simple, pale brick forms arranged around semi-enclosed, landscaped courtyards, creating  spaces of genuine quiet and respite – even though part of it fronts onto the city’s busy Govan Road. Wienerberger white Marziale brick was specified throughout on the blocks, complementing its white concrete porticos and counter pointing the dark aluminium window reveals and green roof. It’s procured by charity Yorkhill Family House, and if this is the level of quality that’s possible in national health architecture, can we Go Large with it please?

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