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Indie generation

Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek
Credit: Ray Schram

Camden market, a Mecca for its second hand stalls and trinkets for the magpies of Europe’s indie youth, now has something much bigger but no less sparkly to catch the eye. Nick Baker architects has installed 925 Kingspan Solar Varisol thermal evacuated tube collectors on the south face of its new, mixed-use development in the conservation area to create a distinctive facade that also reduces the building’s carbon footprint. Placed horizontally in banks to deal with the curve of the site, the system doesn’t employ the usual fixed sized panels but allows any number of tube collectors to be placed alongside each other to fill an allocated space – an eco allegory for all those emo teenagers who otherwise just wouldn’t fit in.


 

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