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The effective route to passive structural steel fire protection

Steel is resilient, but fire still poses a risk. Specifying a frameless encasement system from a single manufacturer can help keep compliance and installation simple

In association with
Knauf Frameless Steel Encasement System: Protects the structural steel of a building by providing up to four hours' fire protection.
Knauf Frameless Steel Encasement System: Protects the structural steel of a building by providing up to four hours' fire protection.

A new frameless steel encasement system from Knauf aims to make providing a fire safety solution simple for specifiers.

To protect buildings, designers need to consider a fire strategy that factors in Approved Document B, the widely adopted and approved reference for passive fire protection, and BS 9999, the British Standard for fire safety in the design, management and use of buildings.

Any strategy will include specifying products that reduce the exposure of structural steel to high temperatures.

Steel is extremely resilient, only melting when temperatures exceed 1,300°C, but fire still poses a risk.

Temperatures exceeding 500°C will compromise the stability and integrity of steel, increasing the chance of the steel supporting the building collapsing.

The Knauf Frameless Steel Encasement System uses Knauf Fireboard to create encasements of column and beam structural steel work. Combined with staples and Knauf Joint Filler and Tape, this creates a complete protective solution.

The frameless casing works through stapling Knauf Fireboard panels at abutting corners. For steelwork encased on all four sides, Knauf Fireboard is fixed at each corner directly through the material, independent of the structural steel.

Building designers and specifiers are increasingly turning to single systems like this to provide the level of cover they need.

  • Architects are increasingly turning to single systems.
    Architects are increasingly turning to single systems. Credit: AdobeStock
  • The Knauf Frameless Encasement system uses staples to fix board to board, reducing the installation footprint while maintaining performance.
    The Knauf Frameless Encasement system uses staples to fix board to board, reducing the installation footprint while maintaining performance.
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Benefits of specifying the Knauf Frameless Steel Encasement System

  • Provides up to four hours' fire protection while minimising the floor space it takes up - critical when considering the value of sellable floor space while maximising protection.
  • A1 rated Knauf Fireboard is available in a range of sizes, from 15mm to 30mm, each providing a different level of protection against fire.
  • Different sizes of board can be used to achieve the desired fire rating without having to over-engineer a solution.
  • Bespoke, cut-to-length fireboard can be provided - depending on order quantities. This reduces waste and labour on site.
  • Sourcing a single comprehensive solution means one point of contact and manufacturer.
  • Installation is covered by the Knauf full system performance warranty, providing peace of mind for contractors and building owners.

For more information and technical support, visit knauf.co.uk/frameless-encasement

 

Contact:

01795 424499

info@knauf.co.uk


 

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