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Look mum – no hands!

A touch-free washroom

I put it down to all that bracing mountain climbing and Lederhosen, but Aryans have a fascination with health and cleanliness oft seen as curious by their Anglo-Saxon brothers. It accounts for that shelf in their loos, allowing you to analyse your stool before consigning it – and then deciding to modify your daily diet accordingly. That fascination for wellbeing continues in the latest concept by Swiss firm Franke – a wholly touch-free commercial washroom. Yep, with its ‘Way 2 Solutions’, the firm will design, plan and supply whole rooms that are completely touch-free. A simple swish of the hand will open and close a cubicle door and dispense the water, soap, and hot air to dry them. Of course the critical process remains a manual one, but until someone manages to put the ‘bot’ in ‘Robot’, we think Franke has pretty much cleaned up.

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