img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

These platform lifts offer innovative access solutions at heritage sites

Cambridge-based firm's inclusive architectural designs can be tailored to any project, from historical settings to contemporary new-builds

In association with
Lyfthaus bespoke Heritage Collection disabled platform lift at Windsor Castle. The lift gate is on the left, shown at ground-floor level.
Lyfthaus bespoke Heritage Collection disabled platform lift at Windsor Castle. The lift gate is on the left, shown at ground-floor level.

Lyfthaus is a British company that designs and manufactures bespoke disabled access platform lifts.

The Cambridge-based firm aims to spark creative thinking around architectural platform lift design.

Its expert team is helping architects create tailored solutions for a wide range of projects, from heritage to contemporary; big statements to discreet details. 

Lyfthaus works with specifiers to design spaces that are accessible in ways that complement and enhance individual settings. It makes platform lift concepts a vertical transport reality.

Platform lift size, configuration, style, materials and finish can all be provided to meet individual requirements. There are very few limitations.

Lyfthaus platform lifts can be found in prestigious buildings across the UK, from Gloucester Cathedral to Buckingham Palace, and beyond, from the Emerald Palace Kempinski Dubai hotel to the Western Australian Museum in Perth.

  • The raised Lyfthaus platform lift viewed from ground-floor level.
    The raised Lyfthaus platform lift viewed from ground-floor level.
  • The raised Lyfthaus platform lift viewed from the upper level.
    The raised Lyfthaus platform lift viewed from the upper level.
12

For more information and technical support, visit lyfthaus.com

 

Contact:

01440 731111

lifts@lyfthaus.com


 

 

Latest

The Light Roof ideas competition, run in conjunction with Keylite Roof Windows,  asked entrants to design a generous family home where the only daylight came from directly above

Light Roof ideas competition, run with Keylite Roof Windows, asked for house designs only daylit from above

Stephen Macbean's design, using ingenious rooflights to direct its occupants’ vision skyward,  was overall winner of the RIBAJ/Keylite Roof Windows competition

Stephen Macbean's design uses ingenious rooflights to direct its occupants’ vision skyward

Soraya Somarathne’s subterranean residence, designed for the grounds of Lambeth Palace, incorporates building techniques found in the Indian villages of Rohtak

Soraya Somarathne’s subterranean residence is designed for the grounds of Lambeth Palace

Matthew Bate has updated the 1800s back-to-back house, addressing poor lighting and ventilation by means of a long, triangular roof lantern

Matthew Bate has updated the back-to-back house, improving lighting with a long, triangular roof lantern

Martin Gruenanger's sunken courtyard provides daylight and natural ventilation in this house extension that doubles the floor area

Martin Gruenanger's sunken courtyard provides daylight to this extension to an existing house