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Why architects need a more strategic approach to ventilation

Changes to Part L mean specifiers must find new ways to identify and procure louvres if they are to efficiently manage air into internal spaces

In association with
Renson ventilation louvres at TP Bennett's Filmworks mixed-use development in Ealing.
Renson ventilation louvres at TP Bennett's Filmworks mixed-use development in Ealing.

Ventilation specialist Renson wants to change the way specifiers identify and procure louvres.

The move follows the company's upgrading of its most widely specified ventilation louvres to accommodate a 50 per cent free area (while retaining its weatherability class A rating). 

Most know how a louvre looks externally, with its linear bars orientated horizontally or vertically on the facade... But what about the parts you don’t see?

The rear of the louvre is just as important as the front; hidden behind is the thermal protection, the plenums and duct connections for the mechanical installations. This element has traditionally been specified separately from the louvre, but why not consider the complete louvre unit as part of an integrated ventilation solution (IVS)?

Ventilation is becoming ever more critical to consider when designing buildings and Part L's higher airtightness levels require a more strategic method of managing air into internal spaces.

'We are approached time and again by contractors who are having problems with poor airflow and water ingress due to messy connections created on site,' explains Bill Hayward, Renson's UK sales director.

'We are also aware from our construction partners that the connection has often been left uncosted and omitted from any packages. We want to provide the solution and take on the responsibility of performance; it’s where our expertise can add so much value to the project.'

  • Renson 411 louvre with thermal backing panel and spigot.
    Renson 411 louvre with thermal backing panel and spigot.
  • Renson 414 louvre with thermal backing panel and spigot.
    Renson 414 louvre with thermal backing panel and spigot.
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With the entire system being manufactured in its UK factory and the rigorous testing undertaken, Renson provides safety by design and a high-performance, watertight and airtight ventilation system. 

Its talented and technical teams can assess and create innovative, customised louvre solutions for more complex ventilation strategies.

With 50 years of experience in the design, development and production of high performance ventilation products, Renson supplies fully tested, high-quality louvres for every application.

For more information and technical support, visit renson.eu/professionals

 

Contact:

01622 754123

chloe.sorak@rensonuk.net


 

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