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Words:
Jan-Carlos Kucharek
Credit: Philip Vile

It looks like navigation was one of the inspirations for Marks Barfield’s Pavilion in Greenwich – no surprise there as the area’s famous for its historic maritime links. So it picked up on shipbuilding aspects too, using brass, copper, timber and steel. The complex suspended  ceilings within and spanning the two gateway buildings were fabricated and installed by SAS International and were based around notional fields of magnetic attraction, alluding to the compass equipment crucial to maritime exploration. There was some exploration going on here too – SAS had never curved  its Tubeline system before and it involved a CNC tube roller to produce the varying radii to create a skin that competently circumnavigates the form. 


 

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