img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

The only way is up

The only way is up

When it came to its design for the Paramount House hotel in Sydney’s Surry Hills, local firm Breathe Architecture looked not only to the site, a 1930s warehouse, but to the adjacent art deco buildings around it and its film precinct location. Building a grand extra storey off the original roof level, the firm covered the whole in an angular chevron facade of perforated and opaque copper tiles, part of the Aurubis Nordic Standard range. With either brick or glass behind, the design allows for ‘curated’ views of the city as well as modifying the strong Australian light and reducing glare. Breathe Architecture said: ‘The delicate jewel-like Nordic Copper chevron crown captures the spirit and excitement of the golden era of film. The project explores the narrative between artefact and ornament, of place and of home.’

Latest

Despite its embodied carbon, masonry is still the default construction method. What are the alternatives?

Masonry is still the default construction method, but it needn’t be

A new report by parliament’s Housing, Communities & Local Government Committee reviews the government’s proposed reform of the planning system. The committee chair discusses the issues

How complicated is it to simplify planning?

How can we reduce the number of disputes that plague construction? Assessing where problems may lie is key to taking essential preventative action

Identify, collaborate, mitigate. Network Rail’s DAPs show the way

Construction workers are ageing, returning to the EU and rethinking after furlough, but Build Back Better needs the industry to expand. We’re back in skills shortage territory – big time

Who wants a job in construction? And who will train them?

Brad Walls’ photograph Form evokes the world-sized work of Superstudio while its swimmers recall Koolhaas’ The Story of the Pool, with a splash of Hockney thrown in

Aerial view of synchronised swimmers references Hockney, Koolhaas and Superstudio