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The Woodentops

You should always look up when you hear the word ‘Timber!’, and now Armstrong Ceilings has given you another reason to. The firm has expanded its range of wooden suspended ceilings – an innovation it launched last year with grids, tiles and planks in wood veneer for a high-end finish, and more affordable laminate. All are easily installed and give rapid access for HVAC and electrical runs above them. Now it’s all the threes, with the range available as hook-on panels in three panel sizes of up to 2.4m long, with three veneers and with three perforation options, for optimal acoustics.

 

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