img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Architects hang your heads in shame! It turns out most of the really good projects in 2014’s Galvanisers Awards (for which the prize is a very handsome watering can!) were in the engineering category. Artist Rob Mulholland’s 6m high sculpture ‘Skytower’, for a remote park in Scotland, a galvanised structure of steel twigs frozen in the process of being blown away, so resonated with architectonic poetry that the judges blew it into the architecture category to win. This left the engineering field free for a biomass storage facility designed by contractor Total Steelwork that was not only highly delicate, but designed to follow the angle of repose of the sawdust (right). And all covered in a lightweight fabric, like taut skin over bare bones. Bravo! 

Latest

If batteries can bridge the gap between power and mobility in transport systems, what could they bring to buildings?

And after transport… buildings?

Lack of evidence for impact assessment sees Cementa’s limestone mining application turned down as Europe tightens the environmental screw

Cement firm's mining license suspension signals tougher EU stance on eco-damage

Architects’ value is their combination of deep generalist and broad specialist knowledge, says Alan Jones

The profession’s knowledge should see the whole project through

They may be unloved but, in these exceptional times, the out-of-town compounds could play a key role in establishing new workplace models

The unloved out-of-town compound could play a key role in establishing new workplace models

The new getaway for a writer in the Danish countryside will tell an evolving story as it patinates – and could offer rural vernacular a hope

A house for a writer, what book does it conjure up?