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ASSA ABLOY launches DC6113 door closer

Specifying the access solutions specialist's new slimline transom design makes it easier than ever to create compliant buildings that are fully accessible

In association with
The DC6113 slimline transom door closer: Striking the balance between the closing of a door to keep a building safe and secure and making it accessible and inclusive to all.
The DC6113 slimline transom door closer: Striking the balance between the closing of a door to keep a building safe and secure and making it accessible and inclusive to all.

ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions UK & Ireland is launching a new slimline transom door closer for public buildings, commercial offices, education facilities, retail environments and more.

The DC6113's Cam-Motion® technology creates a rapidly decreasing torque curve, enabling all users to enter a building easily, even through heavier doors. 

Specifying the door closer in a building guarantees architects are meeting not just security and/or fire requirements, says the company, but also the latest inclusive design standards. These comprise BS 8300-2:2018 (the British Standard setting out how buildings should be designed, constructed and maintained to create an accessible and inclusive environment for all); Approved Document M (the building regulation for access to and the use of buildings); and the Equality Act 2010 (the basis of anti-discrimination law in the UK).

The DC6113 is the only door closer on the market to achieve both BS 8300-2:2018 and EN1154 at EN power size 3 in a compact design. Many transom door closers only achieve these standards at EN power size 2 or are overly large and therefore not compliant with heavier doors and smaller door sections.

  • The DC6113: Suitable for fire and smoke protection doors up to 60 minutes.
    The DC6113: Suitable for fire and smoke protection doors up to 60 minutes.
  • ASSA ABLOY's best practice guide for architects, 'Inclusive Design - Why should you care?'
    ASSA ABLOY's best practice guide for architects, 'Inclusive Design - Why should you care?'
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The fallout of non-compliance can include discrimination claims so it is essential architects understand the requirements and ensure they are fully covered.

To help, ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions UK & Ireland's best practice guide to specifying door hardware, 'Inclusive Design - Why should you care?', explains the policies governing inclusive design and how to meet fire door safety needs.

For more information about the DC6113 door closer, visit assaabloyopeningsolutions.co.uk/dc6113 or call the number below to arrange a demonstration.

To download a PDF of 'Inclusive Design - Why should you care?', go to assaabloyopeningsolutions.co.uk/inclusivedesign 

For more information and technical support, visit assaabloyopeningsolutions.co.uk

 

Contact:

0845 070 6713

AASS-Forum@assaabloy.com


 

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