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Installation inspiration: 3 themed facades that work

A trio of projects reveals how working with an expert rainscreen systems company can help architects achieve distinctive buildings

In association with
Student accommodation at the Dyson Institute for Engineering and Technology, Malmesbury, Wiltshire.  Wilkinson Eyre. The residential pods are finished with Bailey’s anodised aluminium rainscreen panels.
Student accommodation at the Dyson Institute for Engineering and Technology, Malmesbury, Wiltshire. Wilkinson Eyre. The residential pods are finished with Bailey’s anodised aluminium rainscreen panels. Credit: Dyson / Peter Landers

The external facade of a building can play a seminal role in realising an architectural vision, particularly where space and function place limitations on a building’s form.

Rainscreen systems company Bailey Total Building Envelope has been working with the architects of three landmark UK projects to create innovative themed facades. 

  • Dyson Institute for Engineering and Technology: accommodation designed to immerse students in a progressive and dynamic living environment.
    Dyson Institute for Engineering and Technology: accommodation designed to immerse students in a progressive and dynamic living environment. Credit: Dyson / Peter Landers
  • Bailey's anodised aluminium panels combine durability, colour stability and low maintenance.
    Bailey's anodised aluminium panels combine durability, colour stability and low maintenance. Credit: Dyson / Peter Landers
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Case study 1: Dyson Institute for Engineering and Technology, Malmesbury, Wiltshire. Wilkinson Eyre

The Dyson Institute combines higher education with commercial research and development and is built on an ambition to become the best engineering university in the world.

Its student accommodation needed to complement the Institute’s approach to education and reflect its aspirations.

Dyson’s vision was to bring together innovative visual, structural and material solutions that would immerse students in a progressive and dynamic living environment.

The solution was a series of residential pods, finished with Bailey’s anodised aluminium rainscreen panels for a clean, modular aesthetic.

The anodised aluminium combines durability and colour stability with low maintenance and is a popular choice for modern facades, featuring a range of gloss levels and metallic finishes.

  • Telehouse North Two datacentre, Poplar, Tower Hamlets. Bailey's intricate perforated panels create a circuit board themed facade.
    Telehouse North Two datacentre, Poplar, Tower Hamlets. Bailey's intricate perforated panels create a circuit board themed facade.
  • Bailey assisted in creating workable drawings of Telehouse North Two's panel design.
    Bailey assisted in creating workable drawings of Telehouse North Two's panel design.
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Case study 2: Telehouse North Two datacentre, London Docklands. Nicholas Webb Architects​  

Telehouse North Two in Poplar, Tower Hamlets is a £135 million 11-floor datacentre facility.

The creation of Nicholas Webb Architects, its exterior features a Bailey-manufactured printed circuit board thematic design. The building, which is particularly striking when illuminated at night, has become a modern landmark in London’s financial district.

A dedicated project management team at Bailey worked closely with the architect and facade contractor Prater. They provided technical advice from the early stages and assisted in creating workable drawings of the panel design using the latest 3D software.

These drawings were integral to the precise manufacturing process and the correct installation of the complex circuitry pattern.

Bailey also supplied the expanded mesh panels to the rear of the building. These were also modelled in 3D to ensure they fitted into the grid system and allowed for the projection of the steel supports between panels.

  • The building at the western end of the new Tottenham Court Road Crossrail station has Bailey perforated panels that reference the windows of Victorian pub the Bath House, which once stood in nearby Fareham Street.
    The building at the western end of the new Tottenham Court Road Crossrail station has Bailey perforated panels that reference the windows of Victorian pub the Bath House, which once stood in nearby Fareham Street. Credit: Hawkins\Brown
  • Western end of the Crossrail Tottenham Court Road Station development on Oxford Street.
    Western end of the Crossrail Tottenham Court Road Station development on Oxford Street. Credit: Hawkins\Brown
  • The building from Great Chapel Street.
    The building from Great Chapel Street. Credit: Hawkins\Brown
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Case study 3: Tottenham Court Road Station. Hawkins\Brown

Hawkins\Brown was appointed to design and deliver the over-site development above the Western Ticket Hall of Tottenham Court Road station.

This is where retail and residential space integrates with a new ticket hall, as part of the wider Tottenham Court Road Crossrail station project that stretches  west along Oxford Street to Great Chapel Street.

Elements of the design include references to premises that were taken down to make way for the new railway.

Bailey manufactured and supplied the ornamented panels in the Oxford Street block, which are based on the etched glass windows of the Bath House pub that once stood on the corner of nearby Fareham Street.

For more information and technical support, visit builtwithbailey.com

 

Contact:

01403 261844

ask@builtwithbailey.com


 

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