img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Bespoke Sintered Stone surfaces specified at Costa Brava hotel

A tailor-made material inspired by the pearlescence of the sea was the key to a refurbishment project on the Spanish coast

In association with
Neolith Sintered Stone on the floors of the Llevant Hotel, Llafranc, Girona. The surface material is super resistant and easy to cut to size and install.
Neolith Sintered Stone on the floors of the Llevant Hotel, Llafranc, Girona. The surface material is super resistant and easy to cut to size and install.

Award-winning architect Pau Llimona was commissioned to redesign the interior of the Hotel Llevant in Llafranc on the Costa Brava. Always fascinated by the mystique of the Mediterranean Sea, he saw the brief as an opportunity to incorporate the link between the local area and the sea into his design concept. 

Textured flooring was to be the key component of his new design and he was after something that could recreate the roughness, shine and pearlescence of the sea. To mimic the sparkling reflection of the bright sun on water, he required a surface that would reveal subtle flecks of blue and red when the light hit it. 

Llimona approached Sintered Stone company Neolith and it developed a custom-made colour with a textured river-washed finish that became the major design component of  the project. Sintered Stone slabs were cut into various sized rectangular floor tiles and laid to create a uniform, but irregular, tessellating effect with a clean finish.

'We chose Neolith because it's one of very few companies that offer bespoke designed surfaces,' explains Llimona, 'and being able to deviate from standard ranges and manufacturing procedures gives architects greater creative freedom.'

  • Neolith Sintered Stone is 100 per cent natural, which appealed to architect Pau Llimona because he wanted to evoke a naturally occurring event.
    Neolith Sintered Stone is 100 per cent natural, which appealed to architect Pau Llimona because he wanted to evoke a naturally occurring event.
12345

Llimona was also keen to recreate the Levantadas - the waves formed by the Levante wind - on the ceilings. To achieve the effect he used layers of stippled plaster punctuated with angled lighting to create the impression of gaps in the froth. Rising up through the hotel from the restaurant to the rooms, the texture of the ceilings becomes smoother with every floor, emphasising the evanescent nature of a wave. The metal rods that feature throughout embody the meaning of 'Levantada' - to lift up.

'Pau has done an incredible job,' say the hotel's owners. 'The interiors offer guests a totally immersive experience - it’s like stepping into another world.'

Neolith is a natural, recyclable compact surface made of clays, feldspar, silica and natural mineral oxides with impressive resistance and durability properties. It has near-zero porosity, making it hygienic, easy to clean and impervious to chemicals.

For more on this case study, go to neolith.com/case-studies

For more information and technical support, visit neolith.com

 

Contact:

01279 454301


 

Latest

Can 3D printed concrete become a viable option for construction? A lighter, more sophisticated, more sustainable version of Holcim’s Striatus Bridge suggests it could

Can 3D printed concrete become a viable option for construction?

University of Bath team joins 15 other partners in European project ‘Inbuilt’ to develop 10 natural and bio-based building materials

University of Bath joins ‘Inbuilt’ project creating natural and bio-based building materials

Embodied carbon and how best to use limited resources took centre stage at the RIBA’s most recent Smart Practice conference

How can we break our addictions to fossil fuels, waste and consumption?

Strengthening the 18th century, timber-framed Corn Exchange and connecting it to an upgraded 1930s Studio Theatre were key to opening the arts centre to modern audiences

How FCBStudios and Max Fordham refurbished the listed Corn Exchange and Studio Theatre

Western modernism came to colonial West Africa and India, but with independence they made it their own. Tropical Modernism: Architecture and Independence follows the story

Locals made ‘progressive, optimistic’ style their own