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Heavy 3 Slate specified at award winning new-build

Cupa Pizarras tiles achieve a traditional look with a difference at a property adjacent to the Gleneagles Hotel in Auchterarder

In association with
The Pines, Auchterarder. 'Slate was our first choice as it was familiar locally,' says architect Fiona Robinson.
The Pines, Auchterarder. 'Slate was our first choice as it was familiar locally,' says architect Fiona Robinson.

Cupa Pizarras Heavy 3 natural slate has been specified at a new-build family home adjacent to the Gleneagles Hotel in Auchterarder, Scotland. 

The arts and crafts-inspired house was designed by Thomas Robinson Architects and, while slate is not a typical choice for the architectural period, the Gleneagles Estate was keen for the project to work in harmony with the local area, where it is widely used as a roofing material.

The 680mdiminishing course natural slate roof features a 50-degree pitch with each course getting progressively shorter in length towards the roof’s ridge. Heavy 3 natural slate provides a traditional look along with the high-performance, hardwearing finish needed to withstand the unforgiving Scottish weather.

Blue-black Heavy 3 slate is supplied in a 300x200mm format and, unlike artificial products, the colour and properties stay unalterable through time with no maintenance required. Split to an average thickness of 7 to 9mm and featuring non-rusting metallic particles and thin laminations that form a riven surface, the finish is well suited to traditional architectural styles.

The property features a combination of warm and cold roof construction. The specification of the warm roof generally comprises 245mm-deep timber rafters built up with a 190mm thickness of insulation, a 50mm air gap, traditional sarking boards and a layer of Proctor Roofshield Breather Membrane.

The Heavy 3 slates are fixed with copper nails combined with complex leadwork detailing, which includes lead soakers and wood roll verge detail. This creates a robust, cohesive weatherproof system in line with Scottish building regulations.

The roof includes mini dormer windows to break up the expansive roof space, giving a fine detailed edge to the appearance of the house externally and creating a pleasing effect from the inside.

The Thomas Robinson Architects' project won The Herald Property Awards for Scotland 2017 in the Individual New Build or Small Development category.

  • Cupa Pizarras Heavy 3 natural slate: Thicker natural slate is needed to protect buildings from dampness through capillarity and from the high winds that prevail in some parts of Scotland.
    Cupa Pizarras Heavy 3 natural slate: Thicker natural slate is needed to protect buildings from dampness through capillarity and from the high winds that prevail in some parts of Scotland.
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For more information and technical support, visit cupapizarras.com/uk/

 

Contact:

0203 904 3001

uk@cupapizarras.com


 

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