The 18th century ‘König von England’ in Stuttgart’s Schillerplatz was first home to one of Germany’s earliest coffee houses, opening in 1712. Converted in 1798 to an inn, and renamed the ‘King of England’, the building was ironically destroyed by Allied troops near the end of WWII. It was the only building in Schillerplatz not to be reconstructed after the war, instead replaced by an administration block for the Baden-Würtemburg state ministry – listed in 1984. Recently refurbished, the architect optimised acoustics in its meeting areas with GKD’s funky anodised CMP aluminium mesh acoustic ceiling. The stiff honeycomb mesh covers an area of almost 100m2 in gold, and is accentuated by strange hovering LED luminaires. Both give a right royal feeling to the new ‘King of England’s’ ceiling.

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