The 18th century ‘König von England’ in Stuttgart’s Schillerplatz was first home to one of Germany’s earliest coffee houses, opening in 1712. Converted in 1798 to an inn, and renamed the ‘King of England’, the building was ironically destroyed by Allied troops near the end of WWII. It was the only building in Schillerplatz not to be reconstructed after the war, instead replaced by an administration block for the Baden-Würtemburg state ministry – listed in 1984. Recently refurbished, the architect optimised acoustics in its meeting areas with GKD’s funky anodised CMP aluminium mesh acoustic ceiling. The stiff honeycomb mesh covers an area of almost 100m2 in gold, and is accentuated by strange hovering LED luminaires. Both give a right royal feeling to the new ‘King of England’s’ ceiling.

Latest

Becky Clark, also secretary of the Cathedrals Fabric Commission for England, talks about Notre-Dame and how to ensure such an event doesn't happen here

Church of England director on the lessons of Notre-Dame

Carolina Sandretto's book lovingly captures Cuba's declining but once-glorious cinema culture

Carolina Sandretto's shots capture a lost way of life

Architects are none too excited about future prospects, and it looks like they have good cause to be gloomy

Signs are there's cause for serious concern

Carmody Groarke’s Lake District boating museum has been a long time coming, but it’s been worth the wait

Carmody Groarke celebrates Windermere's heritage

Mat Barnes, director at environmental practice CAN, chooses three of his specification favourites

Mat Barnes of CAN chooses three specification favourites