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How to navigate the sustainability imperative

The ongoing push to minimise and continually reduce our carbon footprint extends into every area of business. Make sure your practice is using the tools that have the least impact

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No business can operate without a clear sustainability agenda - it is essential.
No business can operate without a clear sustainability agenda - it is essential.

Every year Larry Fink, the chairman and CEO of the world’s largest investor Blackrock, writes to the CEOs of the companies it has a stake in. His last two letters have focused on a single topic: sustainability. 

Fink told CEOs that business must 'reassess core assumptions about modern finance', concluding that 'climate risk is investment risk'.

What this means is that companies that do not consider the environment will find they are bottom of the pile when it comes to investment. This will also affect privately owned businesses because their clients, who are most likely under investment, will insist on ever-more sustainable solutions. 

This sustainability imperative will therefore extend beyond business operation and business execution and into every area of a business’s function. 

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) sector is perceived as being resource-heavy, but it’s possible to mitigate much of the environmental impact of a build in novel ways, for example through highly efficient operation or the smart use of renewables during the construction phase. 

Zero carbon buildings are no longer unattainable and are now aspirations for firms and for clients. Similarly, modern AEC businesses must look at new ways to minimise their overall carbon footprint and keep reducing it. No business can operate without a clear sustainability agenda – it is a business imperative. 

This means finding and using the tools that have the least impact while maintaining high value for businesses.

  • HP DesignJet Series: Print remains one of the best ways to reduce the carbon footprint of a business.
    HP DesignJet Series: Print remains one of the best ways to reduce the carbon footprint of a business.
  • HP DesignJet: Extreme simplicity enables user collaboration and multitasking.
    HP DesignJet: Extreme simplicity enables user collaboration and multitasking.
  • HP was ranked top in Newsweek's America's Most Responsible Companies list for two years in a row: 2020 and 2021.
    HP was ranked top in Newsweek's America's Most Responsible Companies list for two years in a row: 2020 and 2021.
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Print remains one of the best ways to reduce the carbon footprint of a business. It has traditionally been seen as wasteful, but recent developments have turned that perception on its head.  

HP has a long history of producing products that are made from recycled materials and designed to be recycled. 

Its DesignJet Series of printers are designed for collaboration, multitasking and extreme simplicity and, with this series, HP has offset the remaining carbon impact. Using HP Click software, architects can print multi-size A3/B, A1/D or A0/E without manual intervention to switch the media source.

HP was ranked top in Newsweek's America's Most Responsible Companies list for two years in a row: 2020 and 2021. 

Find out more about the HP DesignJet Series at hp.com/gb-en

 

Contact:

Jason Bishop, DesignJet & PW category manager at HP UK&I

0560 109 5964

jason.bishop2@hp.com


 

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