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World Green Roof Day 2022 pushes for a greener urban skyline

Building solutions firm offers two residential case studies that have utilised Ravatherm XPS X extruded polystyrene insulation board for market-leading thermal performance

In association with

Ravago Building Solutions has launched a new video to mark World Green Roof Day 2022 (6 June).

It offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse at how Ravatherm XPS X insulation is helping the construction industry build a greener urban skyline. 

Showcasing the green and blue roofs at two newly occupied London residential developments - The Forge in Upton Park and Unity Place, part of the South Kilburn Regeneration Programme - the video captures the process and art behind the green roof solution through interviews with project contributors. 

Aerial footage of both projects is interspersed with a high-speed drone tour of the King’s Lynn, Norfolk plant that produced the high-performance Ravatherm XPS X extruded polystyrene insulation board used to construct both roofs.

Ravago began making the UK’s first-ever range of XPS insulation products here over 60 years ago. 

  • Unity Place, Kilburn. The green roofs provide biodiversity benefits. Ravatherm XPS X uses available space efficiently in order to achieve low U-values.
    Unity Place, Kilburn. The green roofs provide biodiversity benefits. Ravatherm XPS X uses available space efficiently in order to achieve low U-values.
  • The Forge in Upton Park is in a high flood risk area and required limited water discharge. Blue roofs at high levels combined with underground tanks help limit the amount of drainage from the site.
    The Forge in Upton Park is in a high flood risk area and required limited water discharge. Blue roofs at high levels combined with underground tanks help limit the amount of drainage from the site.
  • From left: Richard Powell, Natalie Sutton and Joan Ferrer of Ravago Building Solutions.
    From left: Richard Powell, Natalie Sutton and Joan Ferrer of Ravago Building Solutions.
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'Our rapidly changing world requires that we adapt how we live, work and build,' says Ravago commercial director, UK & Ireland, Joan Ferrer.

'Green and blue roofs like those at The Forge and Unity Place are important tools in designing resilient and people-centred cities. Creating visually attractive and usable space contributes to biodiversity and mitigates flood risk.'

Alongside Ferrer, narrators on the video include Richard Powell, roofing sales manager; Natalie Sutton, account manager (south of England); and James Curson, reliability and productivity specialist.

Among the collaborators from Ravago's long-standing partner Radmat Building Products are area technical manager Michael Fadian and head of technical and operations Mark Harris, in his capacity as chair of trade association the Green Roof Organisation. 

By launching the video on World Green Roof Day 2022, Ravago aims to offer a fresh perspective on the possibilities of urban construction and contribute greater momentum to the green roof movement. 

For more information and technical support, visit: ravagobuildingsolutions.co.uk

 

Contact:

technical.uk.rbs@ravago.com


 

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