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Conservation Rooflight updates Victorian original

The Rooflight Company's heritage product for listed buildings is a thermally efficient version of a classic cast-iron design

In association with
Conservation Rooflights offer a simple, cost-effective way to introduce more light into historic buildings.
Conservation Rooflights offer a simple, cost-effective way to introduce more light into historic buildings.

Renovations and extensions to listed buildings and properties in conservation areas are subject to planning restrictions. 

To complement the design and character of a building, and avoid projects being potentially rejected by planning authorities, architects need to choose products and materials with care.

The Rooflight Company created the Conservation Rooflight to replicate the Victorian cast-iron model. It combined period styling with industry innovations to ensure the product met building regulations and satisfied English Heritage and The National Trust requirements, while incorporating the latest thermal efficiencies.

The Conservation Rooflight is made from 3mm mild steel with a protective polyester powder coating to BS EN ISO 12944. Like its Victorian counterpart, it is robust and built to last.

The rooflight features slim clean lines, a low profile to match the roofline and linking bars for every size. A top-hinged opening and exterior glazing clips help retain the authentic appearance. The unit achieves a whole unit U-value of 1.5 W/m2K in accordance with EN ISO 10077-2:2012.

  • Conservation Rooflights have a top-hinged opening (as opposed to centre-pivoted) for an authentic appearance.
    Conservation Rooflights have a top-hinged opening (as opposed to centre-pivoted) for an authentic appearance.
  • The Conservation Rooflight has slim clean lines, a low profile to match the roofline and linking bars for every size.
    The Conservation Rooflight has slim clean lines, a low profile to match the roofline and linking bars for every size.
  • The Conservation Plateau is the only flat rooflight designed specifically for heritage buildings. It features an authentic skirt design.
    The Conservation Plateau is the only flat rooflight designed specifically for heritage buildings. It features an authentic skirt design.
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The Conservation Plateau is the only flat rooflight designed specifically for heritage buildings with an authentic skirt design. It has a U-value of 1.4 W/m2K.

All Rooflight Company heritage roof windows are fitted with a Thermoliner, which allows condensation to be controlled and limits the risk of mould. The standard frame is finished in textured semi-gloss RAL 9005 Jet Black.

There is a wide range of standard sizes in stock to fit all rafter widths, as well as a made-to-measure service that can help preserve the integrity of a building by avoiding the need to cut existing rafters. 

The Studio Range offers the option of creating a run of Conservation Rooflights to maximise light ingress and ventilation without losing original features. An in-house bespoke design team is available for further advice.

For more information and technical support, visit therooflightcompany.co.uk

 

Contact:

01993 833155

enquiries@therooflightcompany.co.uk


 

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