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Words:
Tim Stonor

If you want integration you need a team to match

Cities planning their future are increasingly turning to the production of Integrated Urban Models. 

These models are tools that bring together various datasets on different aspects of urban performance, from the behaviour of people to the flows of energy, water and other utilities. The aim is to better predict the future of cities by better understanding how they are currently working.

This is a nascent but rapidly developing field in which knowledge is emerging and evolving at a pace. Given the complexity of cities it is a good idea to involve many specialists in different subjects, led by an Urban Modelling Advisory Panel (UrbanMAP).  

This panel needs a wide range of skills. I suggest the UrbanMAP is made up of 11 people, comprising:

1. A transport technologist with expertise in pedestrians/bikes as well as roads/transit 

2. An infrastructure engineer with utilities capacity expertise 

3. A real estate economist with expertise in locational analytics/spatial economics (housing & jobs)

4. An environmental planning specialist with expertise in the analysis of on-land, on-water and in-air phenomena

5. A construction expert

6. A health expert

7. An anthropologist with expertise in the technological analysis of human behaviour and cultural identity

8. An architect/urban planner/designer with expertise in the creative use of technology

9. A social media technologist with expertise in semantic analysis of online content

10. A data integration specialist with expertise in statistical/correlational analysis and predictive analytics

11. A visualisation specialist with expertise in both 2D and 3D representation.

The group should meet regularly, evolving the vision of the model and the brief for its creation by other consultants.

It should be chaired – or captained – like any good team, by a creative all-rounder: the architect at No.8, whose role is to resolve complexity through elegant and resource-efficient means.


Read more from Tim Stonor here

Tim Stonor is speaking at the Digital Thinking, Smart Building conference - You can book your tickets by clicking here


 

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