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How sustainable are the resin floors you specify?

This durable, repairable flooring product is manufactured in one of the greenest factories in Europe using plant-based - rather than petroleum - derivatives

In association with
Arturo floors: 85 per cent of the ingredients used in its polyurethane resins are obtained from natural raw materials.
Arturo floors: 85 per cent of the ingredients used in its polyurethane resins are obtained from natural raw materials.

Resin floors are typically made from a base of either epoxy or polyurethane resins. 

The production of these resins is largely derived from petroleum, but plant-based sources are now becoming available. Polyurethane resins can be derived from vegetable oils such as soybean, cotton seed and castor bean.

The Arturo range of polyurethane resins from Dutch flooring manufacturer Uzin Utz is made from vegetable oils, which means 85 per cent of the ingredients are obtained from natural raw materials.

Arturo resin floors are suitable for sustainable buildings certification such as BREEAM and all products are solvent-free, low in emissions and manufactured in accordance with ISO 14001.

The sustainable production of Arturo resin floors

Arturo products are produced in a CO2 neutral factory in the Netherlands to help offset the environmental impact of their manufacture.

The facility is one of the most sustainable facilities in Europe and includes a variety of green initiatives: the heating is generated by a combination of pellet and geothermal heating; rain water is used for flushing toilets; and the air, light and temperature are sensor controlled.

Arturo resin floors: lifecycle analysis

Uzin Utz strives to make its products environmentally friendly and has started carrying out lifecycle analysis on its products:

  • Arturo resin floors are durable and long lasting and, when the floors do eventually become tired, they can be repaired or renewed quickly and easily.
  • Arturo resin floors can be recoated with a new colour or design without the need for the removal and wastage associated with other types of floorcoverings.
  • Arturo resin floors do not end up in landfill.
  • Uzin Utz: Arturo resin floors are produced in its CO2 neutral factory in the Netherlands.
    Uzin Utz: Arturo resin floors are produced in its CO2 neutral factory in the Netherlands.
  • When Arturo resin floors eventually shows signs of wear they can repaired or over-coated without the need for the removal and waste associated with other types of floorcovering.
    When Arturo resin floors eventually shows signs of wear they can repaired or over-coated without the need for the removal and waste associated with other types of floorcovering.
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For more information and technical support, visit arturoflooring.com

 

Contact:

01788 530080

arturo.uk@uzin-utz.com


 

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