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Etex sets environmental targets for Equitone cladding brand

Action plan aims to help architects access product information and realise the circular potential of fibre cement facades

In association with
Egaligilo Pavilion by Broissin architects in Museo Tamayo, Mexico City for Mexico Design Week 2019, featuring Equitone Natura and Tectiva fibre cement panels.  'Even though most architects are passionate about building more responsible buildings, they are often held back by expensive sustainable materials or a lack of information.'
Egaligilo Pavilion by Broissin architects in Museo Tamayo, Mexico City for Mexico Design Week 2019, featuring Equitone Natura and Tectiva fibre cement panels. 'Even though most architects are passionate about building more responsible buildings, they are often held back by expensive sustainable materials or a lack of information.'

Constructions solutions company Etex has set out 2030 environmental targets for its fibre cement cladding brand Equitone.

It has developed a three-pronged action plan: designing for circularity, building for light-impact and radical collaboration.

Equitone materials are made of water, Portland cement, cellulose and natural minerals, perfect building blocks, believes the firm, for a circular construction industry. 

Its cladding range incorporates Tectura, Natura, Linea, Pictura and Lunara designs, which offer architects linear facades, raw and uncoated panels and everything in between. 

'We’re working on developing a new generation of fibre cement by shrinking our environmental impact throughout all processes, from design to production,' explains Etex sustainability product manager, Maarten Milis.

'We’re targeting zero potable water use, zero landfill and low carbon emissions and are exploring ways to increase the recycled content of our materials.'

According to Milis, by 2030, Equitone panels will have minimal impact on the environment and maximum durability, without any compromise on quality.

Equitone promises radical openness and collaboration

Equitone is openly sharing its progress and actively seeking innovative partnerships with experts in the field, ranging from architects and academics to fabricators and installers.

'The building sector is responsible for 38 per cent of all energy-related carbon emissions, over 35 per cent of the EU’s total waste generation and half of all extracted materials,' explains Milis.

'Rather than talking our way out of it, we want to acknowledge the need for change and embrace it by strengthening the bridge between science and industry and connecting ideas, people, businesses and resources.'

  • Equitone Linea fibre cement panels: Aiming for a modular system that is easy to dismantle, repair, rebuild and recycle.
    Equitone Linea fibre cement panels: Aiming for a modular system that is easy to dismantle, repair, rebuild and recycle.
  • Equitone fibre cement panels: Shifting the emphasis from long life and lightweight to light impact and circular by design.
    Equitone fibre cement panels: Shifting the emphasis from long life and lightweight to light impact and circular by design.
  • Equitone Linea fibre cement panels: Working towards eliminating the total footprint of materials in production and throughout their entire life cycle.
    Equitone Linea fibre cement panels: Working towards eliminating the total footprint of materials in production and throughout their entire life cycle.
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The company has carried out sustainability sessions with architects to identify the most urgent needs of its customers and define its new global sustainability commitment.

'For architects, sustainability represents a topic that is as frustrating as it is engaging,' says Milis. 'Even though most architects are passionate about building more responsible buildings, they are often held back by expensive sustainable materials or a lack of information.'

In response, Equitone has released a range of tools for architects, including:

  • A manifesto document outlining Equitone's vision and goals for 2030.
  • Interviews with the team behind the brand, demonstrating the importance of internal and external collaboration.
  • An environmental web page on equitone.com.
  • Material Sustainability Datasheets that outline the environmental impact of each Equitone material with links to its EPD.

'We want to cut through the spaghetti of information and give architects the tools they need to transform the industry, one building at a time,' says Milis.

Equitone is planning to provide regular progress reports to keep architects and specifiers updated.

For more information and technical support, visit equitone.com

 

Contact:

01283 501555

infouk@etexgroup.com


 

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