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This is how to use a rooflight in a double volume period property extension

A two-storey addition with eight-metre long glazing overhead provides a light-filled studio attached to the gable end of a Victorian London home

In association with
Architect Atelier Baulier's extension with Glazing Vision Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight. The writing room occupies a mezzanine accessed from the first floor. Whitewashed brick slips mirror the original Victorian brickwork opposite.
Architect Atelier Baulier's extension with Glazing Vision Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight. The writing room occupies a mezzanine accessed from the first floor. Whitewashed brick slips mirror the original Victorian brickwork opposite. Credit: French + Tye

Improving natural sunlight and space were two of the key objectives in the design of a two-storey extension to an end-of-terrace Victorian property in Brockley, south London.

The client, an artist, writer and former fine arts lecturer, had recently moved to London from Oxfordshire to be closer to her family and wanted a peaceful, tranquil space to help improve focus, creativity and productivity when at work.

Looking to update the house into a futureproof property, Atelier Baulier architecture and interior design studio worked with the client to achieve a virtually half-opened roof through the use of a rooflight.

The Glazing Vision Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight was specified. At just short of eight metres, it immerses the entire extension in daylight making the 16 square-metre space feel larger.

The art studio is located under the double-height volume and has even light levels throughout the day.

A writing room occupies the vantage point of the mezzanine above the bathroom and is accessed from the first-floor level through an opening made in the gable.

Keen to retain discreet detailing to ensure the rooflight framing didn't distract from the design, the Multi-Part rooflight was specified with silicone joints, as opposed to aluminium balustrades, making the product much sleeker.

Three wall abutments on the high left and right side open up the space further. These are not visible from the inside, which helps enhance the detail of the rooflight.

The rooflight was supplied in three sections sized to achieve an equal split when viewed from underneath. This meant that the end sections had to be larger to account for the upstand width.

  • The new extension reuses the two-metre by eight-metre footprint of a former lean-to garage.
    The new extension reuses the two-metre by eight-metre footprint of a former lean-to garage. Credit: French + Tye
  • Exposed rafters create an internal brise-soleil effect.
    Exposed rafters create an internal brise-soleil effect. Credit: French + Tye
  • Looking from the original Victorian space into the new extension.
    Looking from the original Victorian space into the new extension. Credit: French + Tye
  • Glazing Vision Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight. The modular system allows multiple glazed sections to be linked togther across a roof space.
    Glazing Vision Multi-Part Flushglaze rooflight. The modular system allows multiple glazed sections to be linked togther across a roof space.
  • 'The volume reaches up for daylight, channelling it down into the existing house through a central opening connecting the rooms.'
    'The volume reaches up for daylight, channelling it down into the existing house through a central opening connecting the rooms.' Credit: French + Tye
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'We aimed to maximise the potential of this unusual site,' explains architect Aurore Baulier. 'Rather than subdividing the space, the programme is housed within one continuous volume, allowing the daylight to flow through.'

The house is in a conservation area and the extension naturally blends in with its surroundings.

Wood-fibre insulated timber construction was used throughout, resulting in a much lower carbon footprint than a traditional masonry wall.

On the interior, brick slips dress the walls, continuing the pattern created by the whitewashed brickwork of the existing gable.

The architects have used the glass rooflight to boost light levels and space in this small Victorian home while enhancing the design with contemporary elements that complement the house's period look and feel. 

Find more on this case study at glazingvision.co.uk/case-study/brockley

For more information and technical support, visit glazingvision.co.uk

 

Contact:

01379 658300 

sales@glazingvision.co.uk


 

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