img(height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2939831959404383&ev=PageView&noscript=1")

Reduce thermal bridging with Hi-therm+ lintels

Keystone's award-winning lintels are an innovative solution to improving SAP calculations, meeting Part L regulations and reducing thermal bridging by up to 80 per cent

In association with
Keystone's Hi-therm+ lintel: Focusing on the fabric of a building is the most cost-effective, reliable and robust method of achieving compliance with future building regulations, as getting the fabric right will save energy throughout the whole life span of a building.
Keystone's Hi-therm+ lintel: Focusing on the fabric of a building is the most cost-effective, reliable and robust method of achieving compliance with future building regulations, as getting the fabric right will save energy throughout the whole life span of a building.

The award winning Hi-therm+ lintel from Keystone provides a low-cost solution for reduced carbon emissions. It is up to five times more thermally efficient than a standard steel lintel.

Openings for windows and doors are vulnerable to heat loss through thermal bridging so the performance of structural elements such as lintels that are installed in these junctions is important.

Lintels are, in most cases, the most significant thermal bridges due to the fact that traditional-style steel lintels interrupt the line of insulation with a continuous piece of highly conductive steel. This could account for more than 40 per cent of the total heat loss through thermal bridging.

Keystone's Hi-therm+ lintels offer a cost-effective solution to lowering carbon emissions within SAP, offering significant savings compared to other popular alternatives.
Keystone's Hi-therm+ lintels offer a cost-effective solution to lowering carbon emissions within SAP, offering significant savings compared to other popular alternatives.

Keystone’s patented Hi-therm+ lintel with its enhanced Psi-value offers specifiers an excellent solution. The innovative design utilises a rigid polymer thermal insulator as an effective thermal break, but incorporates a steel inner and external leaf so it is installed in exactly the same way as a standard lintel.

Using Hi-therm+ lintels in place of standard steel versions can lead to an 80 per cent reduction in thermal bridging through the lintels. By making these large savings on thermal bridging, designers gain the flexibility to trim back on other more expensive options (such as wider cavities) yet still comply with the latest Part L 2013 building regulations.

Keystone's Hi-therm+ lintel is BBA certified and won the Best Building Fabric Product Category at the Housebuilder Product Awards in 2018.

For more information and technical support, visit keystonelintels.com/hi-therm 

 

Contact:

01283 200150

info@keystonelintelsuk.com


 

Latest

As the BSA imposes profound changes on the construction process, Pilbrow & Partners is putting a rigorous checklist and proof of principal designer competence at the heart of its quality control

Pilbrow & Partners is putting collaboration, competence and checking at the heart of quality control

Strong design references underpin a lively journey through changing fashions, styles and careers to reflect the full Barbie-verse

Strong design references underpin a journey through the Barbie-verse

Climate model of Greater London finds white or reflective roofs are significantly more effective at reducing temperatures than both vegetation-covered roofs and deciduous tree cover

White or reflective roofs are much better to reduce temperatures finds climate model

The Featherstone Young director took off for Slovakia for her annual cycling trip with friends, and found a country fascinating for the contrasts thrown up by its emergence from communism

The Featherstone Young director is fascinated by the contrasts of post-communist Slovakia

Of the 26 schemes sifted from the RIBA Regional Awards, it is not only this year's abundance of mega-projects that reached the next round en route to the Stirling Prize

Smaller schemes join big beasts such as the Elizabeth Line and Battersea Power Station