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Lazenby brings polished good looks to floors

Light Natural concrete creates a high-sheen industrial feel over three floors at a Wandsworth retrofit project

In association with
Lazenby polished concrete flooring and surfaces for Housecurious, Wandsworth.
Lazenby polished concrete flooring and surfaces for Housecurious, Wandsworth. Credit: Matt Clayton

Flooring specialist Lazenby has joined forces with Ade Architecture and BTL Property to install polished concrete flooring at events venue Housecurious in Wandsworth, London. 

The brief was to achieve an industrial look for easy, open-plan living. Light Natural concrete with a mottled, satin finish was chosen to cover 207m² of the property. The flooring was installed inside, outside and in the basement at different times without affecting the colour match. Flooring abutting the door track in the kitchen-diner was carefully levelled - there's only one chance to get concrete right.

Skilled craftsmen installed the floors 100mm deep over underfloor heating. Four external concrete steps were installed separately due to their size: each was approximately eight metres long. For as close a match as possible to the connecting patio, all shutters were stripped so the faces could be rendered. The basement required accurate and efficient installation. Exact quantities of C28 concrete were pumped into the right place at the right time and power floated into position. The result is a sleek architectural space. 

Lazenby's industrial-look polished concrete flooring was first used in commercial projects, but it is now specified by architects and designers for residential projects too. Innovations include feature strips, inset materials and textures, cast in-situ staircases with DDA-compliant studs, hidden lighting and handrails, pre-cast wall panels, stair treads and sinks. It is an iconic look for every sector.

For more on this case study, visit: lazenby.co.uk/wandsworth-common-london

  • External concrete installations were colour-matched and levels-matched for a seamless transition through the property.
    External concrete installations were colour-matched and levels-matched for a seamless transition through the property. Credit: Matt Clayton
  • The concrete floor installation in the basement features locally sourced materials.
    The concrete floor installation in the basement features locally sourced materials. Credit: Matt Clayton
  • Basement installation requires precision and care. Exact quantities of C28 concrete were pumped in and power floated into position.
    Basement installation requires precision and care. Exact quantities of C28 concrete were pumped in and power floated into position. Credit: Matt Clayton
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For more information and technical support, visit: lazenby.co.uk

 

Contact:

01935 700306 (Sales - Option 1)

info@lazenby.co.uk


 

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