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Mumford and Wood

British Formula I legend Stirling Moss, no less, launched Mumford and Wood’s new Conservation windows at the Building Centre last month. After signing autographs, and telling the guests how happy he was with the firm’s sashes in his London home, the 85-year old moved to tales of his racing achievements. ‘You find yourself staring straight into people’s faces close-up as you go round,’ he told us of Monte Carlo, adding: ‘Although it looks like a straight run, the scariest bit is the harbour side tunnel. You’d go from bright to dark suddenly at 130mph and it would be difficult to get a sense of the road’s apex’. Last month, the sister car of the Mercedes-Benz W196 in which Moss won the 1955 English Grand Prix sold for £19m, but you feel money’s never been his priority – unlike today, he said, drivers even had to buy their own race tyres. ‘I couldn’t be doing with being dragged off by sponsors for a post-race press conference like Hamilton is now,’ he confided; adding racily, ‘In my day you’d just pop the champagne, step from the podium and be off chasing the crumpet...’

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